TBtB: Moving On

As expected, there was no serious objection to the names of the ballparks the Chicago Cubs and New York Yankees call home – Wrigley Field and Yankee Stadium.

Milwaukee, too, is retaining its current name. While there were some nominees thrown out, the consensus seemed to be that Miller Park works for the Brew Crew.

That leaves us with two holdovers from By Acclimation Week. I’m kind of shocked that so many people think Oriole Park or OPACY is a suitable alternative when the positively glorious Camden Yards is there for the taking, and the name the park is most often called. But we’re going to vote anyway.

Colorado will follow, but we have to sort out the potential nominees first.

 

TBtB: New York Yankees

Ah, perhaps the toughest entry of all for me to come up with, given how I place the Yankees just above Pol Pot and one spot below You Tube stars on my hierarchy of historical malevolence, and that’s only because the Yankees have slipped down a few spaces after the nice anti-bullying spot they recently did.

Yankee Stadium III is that rare new park that seems to be least appreciated by the fans of the club, particularly in comparison with the facility it replaced. From what I can tell, it tends to do better on rankings from non-Yankee partisans.

The name has been a constant, from the place that George Herman had a hand in constructing through the 1970s renovation that maintained the old footprint through the newer place located nearby. It’s not terribly original, but it’s also hard to imagine it being called anything else. Hell, if Yankee fans at BTF are representative of the fanbase as a whole, the bigger question isn’t whether the name is good enough for the park, but whether the ballyard is good enough to be called Yankee Stadium.

Ballpark History

Built: 2009

Capacity: 47,309

Name: Yankee Stadium 2009-present.

Other ballparks used by club in its current city:  Yankee Stadium II (sort of) 1975-2008; Shea Stadium 1973-74; Yankee Stadium I 1923-1973; Polo Grounds 1913-22; Hilltop Park, 1903-12. Stadium also used as home for Major League Soccer’s New York FC.

 

Distinctive Features:  Monument Park; roof frieze; exterior of Indiana limestone (my Hoosier pride); the moats; all those damn pennants.

Ballpark Highlights:
In the first season of the new park, the Yankees appeared on their way to a Subway Series loss to the crosstown Mets when Alex Rodriguez popped up with two on and two out in the bottom of the ninth. However, Luis Castillo dropped the can of corn, giving the Yanks a 9-8 victory.

Later that year, short-rest starter Andy Pettitte extended his record for most career postseason victories to 18 in a 7-3 win over Philadelphia, giving the club its 27th World Series title.

In 2010, Alex Rodriguez homered off poor-spelling Blue Jays pitcher Shawn Marcum for his 600th career dinger, becoming the youngest to join the club. Baseball, Bud Selig and Biogenesis made sure he never reached 700.

In 2011, Derek Jeter became the second player to homer for his 3,000th hit (following equally unlikely candidate Wade Boggs). Icky Yankee mouthpiece Randy Levine strong-armed a fan out of the historic baseball.

One month later, Curtis Granderson hit an eighth-inning grand slam off Oakland’s Bruce Billings. It was the third Yankee slam in the team’s 22-9 victory, the only time in major league history a team had three homers with the bases loaded in the same game.

Teammates Andy Pettitte and Derek Jeter lifted Mariano Rivera with two outs in the eighth inning in the future Hall of Famer’s final game, culminating the first of back-to-back long farewell tours for Yankee greats.